Home

I was given a 35mm camera for my 18th birthday and remember wanting a “bulb” attachement that would allow me to manually control the shutter. I thought this would allow me to take photos of the moon with more clarity than the typical fast shutter action on most cameras. I came to learn that light (and objects) can be captured in motion.

Stroboscopic Motion Photography

Using strobe lights allows the camera to capture the motion of objects on a single 2D print. Harold Edgarton (1930s) is credited with with the first stroboscopic photography. See his photo below of a golf swing. He used a strobe light (flashing light) and was able to calculate speed by measuring the distance between the flashes of light. Check out this online collection of his work.

Bobby Jones Golf Swing

How is the photo below different from stroboscopic motion photography?

Digital Chronophotography III by Telemachus

Digital Chronophotography III by Telemachus
14 hours recording of light movement (from 5:50pm to 07:50am)

This animation shows how the strobe light works.

Strobe 2

Early experiments with this method involved actions such as a bouncing ball.

Stroboscopic Bouncing Ping Pong Ball

Projectile Motion by marc.spooner

Projectile Motion by marc.spooner

Bouncing ball strobe edit

By MichaelMaggs Edit by Richard Bartz (Own work) CC-BY-SA-3.0

Check out this early series of photos taken by Eadweard Muybridge, the first to develop sequences of moving objects.

Muybridge race horse gallop

Photos taken by Eadweard Muybridge (d. 1904)

Muybridge Race Horse Animation by Waugsberg

Muybridge Race Horse Animation by Waugsberg

Studies in Zoopraxography arranged for the Zoopraxiscope by Edweard Muybridge, 1893

Studies in Zoopraxography arranged for the Zoopraxiscope by Edweard Muybridge, 1893

Check out these 45 Beautiful Motion Blur Photos. In addition, here’s a great tutorial for capturing motion in photography.

Harold Edgerton created a silent film called “Seeing the Unseen” in 1936.

Here’s a great article titled, Building and Calibrating a Mechanical Stroboscope.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s